Inclusive Design

Inclusive Design Tips

  1. Element order

    People with cognitive disabilities need clear and consistent presentation of information.

  2. Contrast

    People with visual disabilities need information that has sufficient colour contrast and information that isn’t represented only in colour.

  3. Big fonts

    People with visual difficulties enlarge their fonts so that text is more readable.

  4. No mouse, no trackpad

    People with physical impairments use a keyboard instead of a mouse as it doesn’t require precise movements.

  5. Plain language

    People’s home language can be different to the one your content is written in. People with cognitive difficulties struggle with long or complex content.

  6. On the other hand

    People with physical difficulties (including common ailments like arthritis, or hand injuries) have difficulty with precise movements.

  7. Slow connections

    People with slow connections often disable images, or use offline modes and wait until they can access a better connection (e.g. wifi at work).

  8. Blurred vision

    People with impaired vision struggle to read small text and low contrast colours.

  9. Different device

    People use all kinds of technology and Operating Systems. As website builders and users, we’re often at the edges of tech, using newer and shiner things. Cheap, low spec, Android phones are the most popular devices on the planet. Most internet cafes and many government and NPO offices still run Windows XP and old versions of Internet Explorer.

  10. Network cost

    The less data your site loads, the more accessible it is for people with data constraints. People with lower incomes buy data in smaller amounts, which is more expensive per MB. 70% of South Africans are living on less than R6,000 / month.

  11. Screen reader

    Visually impaired and blind people use screen readers to surf the web. Some people want to hear information as well as read it.

  12. Colour blindness

    About 8% men and 0.5% women have a colour vision deficiency.

  13. Brightness

    People with visual disabilities need information that has sufficient contrast. Anyone can have issues with brightness due to context or environmental factors, for example being outside on a sunny day, or using a device with an old or low quality screen.

  14. Magnify all the things

    People with visual impairments use magnifiers to read on-screen content. While the content inside the magnifier is readable for them, the other information on the page could be out of focus.

  15. Dyslexia

    People who have dyslexia struggle to read long or complex content.

  16. Use Opera Mini

    People on lower incomes, those travelling abroad, or those on very slow connections use Opera Mini. It saves them time and money because it compresses web pages, blocks ads by default, and doesn’t support web fonts.

  17. Precise Movements

    People with physical difficulties (including common ailments like arthritis, or hand injuries) have difficulty with precise movements.

  18. Device Lab

    People use all kinds of weird and wonderful things to access the web. The devices in the lab are good to test on for their own sake, but also act as good proxies for new tech that sometimes acts like old tech (think watches, embedded screens, things like that...)